The Game Cookbook: Review

Date: February 26, 2018 Author: Categories: Eating Sustainably & The 100-Mile Diet

This is the second in the series, Eating Sustainably And The 100 Mile-Diet by Giles Cadman. In the introduction blog, Giles discusses the importance of knowing where your food comes from. Read the introduction here.

I had the pleasure of meeting the historian, author, and broadcaster Sir John Scott, 5th Baronet – one of the authors of a book I’m now quite the fan of: The Game Cookbook.

I had spent a few days with Sir John Scott hunting with him in the country. He has travelled the world, is a real storyteller, and I really enjoyed our time together – swapping stories about life and game.

I was impressed by his thorough knowledge of England, he is really an authority on English history and culture! He’s written numerous books and columns, including The Book Of Britain, but when I stumbled across The Game Cookbook, I related to it in so many ways. 

The Game Cookbook is co-authored by Clarissa Dickson Wright, who unfortunately passed away in 2014, but was well-known from the English cooking show “Two Fat Ladies,” and for many other cookbooks (and a lively autobiography).

Now, in my last in this series, I wrote about the reasons I hunt game – and there are many. I believe in eating sustainably and the 100-mile diet. I hunt because I like to know and understand where my food comes from. Hunting wild game gives the animal its entire life to roam freely (unlike the cruel slaughterhouse); we only hunt what is over-populated and what we are going to eat and enjoy.

For me, it’s about being closer to nature and respecting the animal. This is precisely why I’m a fan of The Game Cookbook. It contains both exciting recipes and insightful information about the history and habitat of game. It’s a tradition that was becoming lost and I’m truly glad this book was written to preserve some of the English culture and history that comes with hunting game.

The chapters are divided like so: types of game – including pheasant, partridge and venison, and then really different, less obvious picks such as coarse fish like pike and carp. Each chapter also gives a history and lore (from the wonderful Sir John Scott) with advice on preparing the game itself. The cookbook contains 130 recipes such as Salmon Fishcakes made with Gnocchi and Partridge with Lentils and Pickled Lemons! There’s quite the variety, and as a cook myself, this book does not bore.

A final word

I’m always striving to be closer to nature and to know a bit more about what I’m eating. I want to have a relationship with the local butcher and understand why the colour of the meat is the way it is. When you practice sustainable eating and keep the 100-mile diet in mind, you’ll also be making a much healthier decision for yourself and the environment. 

Again, I do hope I haven’t offended anyone. It’s not about hunting for trophies, but it’s about hunting something there is an abundance of, keeping the tradition of cooking the food yourself, and knowing where your food comes from. The Game Cookbook allows me to do all of these things beautifully.

Giles Cadman is Chairman of The Cadman Capital Group, a group of cohesive, complementary companies, operating in the international trade, retail, leisure, and investment markets. Learn more about Giles.



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